Andrew J. Freeman, PhD

Andrew Freeman

Andrew J. Freeman, PhD

Andrew Freeman

Are you planning to accept a graduate student for 2020-2021?

Yes! I plan to accept one student. Please feel free to e-mail me with questions. Please check out the links to some great resources on the DIME Lab.

Professional Biography:

Andrew J. Freeman is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Dr. Freeman is the director of the Diagnosis, Irritability, Mood and Energy Research Laboratory (DIME LAB).

My research themes:

  1. Clinical decisions are high-risk decisions because they can have long-term impacts on a person. For example, the choice of diagnosing a person with bipolar disorder, ADHD, autism spectrum disorder or any other mental disorder can change a person’s trajectory. Does the person receive treatment A or treatment B? Does the person receive accommodations at school or work? Clinical decisions expand beyond just determining a diagnosis. Another example of a high-risk decision that interests me is: Should we hospitalize this person? In summary, one line of my research examines how clinicians make decisions, how well their tools perform, and can we improve the process.
  2. The diagnosis of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents remains controversial. Bipolar disorder often impacts children and adolescents across all domains of life. Some general questions that interest me are: (a) How does pediatric bipolar disorder impact a person’s life? (b) What are the mechanisms (e.g., anhedonia, sleep) that sustain mood episodes? (c) Can we change one symptom (e.g., sleep) and create a cascading effect of improvements to other symptoms? In summary, one line of my research examines the impact of bipolar disorder on children and adolescents with a focus on identifying etiological mechanisms.
  3. Science flows to practice through a leaky pipeline. For many reasons, science generated in research labs does not make it all the way to practice. The end effect is that children and adolescents may receive less than optimal courses of treatment. A relatively new interest of mine is attempting to characterize treatment in the community. How long does it last? Is it multidisciplinary? Does it look anything like treatment based on guidelines?

Teaching:

Dr. Freeman teaches undergraduate and graduate courses. At the graduate level, Dr. Freeman teaches (a) Psy 723 – Assessment I: Cognitive and Academic Assessment and (b) Psy 709 – Statistics for Psychologists II. At the undergraduate level, Dr. Freeman teaches (a) Psy 341 – Foundations of Abnormal Psychology and (b) Psy 481: Principles of Psychological Assessment. Dr. Freeman’s undergraduate teaching has been recognized by both institutions and undergraduate organizations.

css.php